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January 25, 2009

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Jake

Great write up. I honestly had never read much about this collapse before.

Chris L

Thanks for this post. I definitely appreciate your thoroughness. And I like the idea of this being a feature (however irregular).

m1k3y

brilliant. look forward to the next in the series.

the Sea People are my new favourite bit of history!

Jim

Pretty amazing. I wish you cited sources, though. Given that you weren't there, there must have been a book, a website or movie that turned you on to this.

The best book I've read in the last three years(and is the one that turned me on to this) is "The Upside of Down" by Thomas Homer-Dixon. That books draws heavily from Joseph Tainter's
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Tainter
book "The Collapse of Complex Societies".

Similar to Jared Diamond, but not the same at all.

Tainter doesn't mention the Sea Peoples at all, but it could fit together.

twitter.com/SmithMillCreek

Re-reading this after forgetting reading it the first time.

Seem to be some triggers for collapses:
- plagues (McNeill, Plagues and Peoples, http://j.mp/50FpP5 )
- Malthusian exhaustion of the soil http://j.mp/6oIiKb
- meteors/comets http://j.mp/YDryas
- volcanoes (maybe not yet)

Richard Welch

A goodly account of a little known historic episode. It might be noted that the invasions of the Sea People are something of a reenforcement of the Atlantis legend which is basically the tale of an intrusion into the east Mediterranean from the west. Most of the Sea People tribes can be traced to old Atlantean territories in the western Mediterrranean (see Roots of Cataclysm, Algora Publ. NY 2009).

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